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Checking a clutch cable

The clutch cable has a steel-wire inner core sliding inside an outer sheath. It should last at least two years, but check it at every main service; if it breaks it may do so without warning. Read more

Adjusting the clutch

To work efficiently, the clutch needs the right amount of play in the linkage between the foot pedal and the clutch operating lever (also known as the release arm or fork). Read more

How to bleed a clutch

Many cars have clutches that work hydraulically. The mechanism that operates them is sturdy and long lasting, requiring only an occasional look in the fluid reservoir (See Checking and removing a clutch master cylinder) to make sure the level is correct. Read more

Checking and removing a clutch master cylinder

If a clutch fails to disengage fully when the pedal is pressed, the problem may be the clutch itself. In a hydraulic clutch, however, the problem may lie in the master or slave hydraulic cylinders. Read more

Fitting new clutch seals and removing a slave cylinder

Always renew the seals whenever you dismantle the master cylinder or slave cylinder. Read more

Replacing and renewing clutch cables

If your car has a cable-operated clutch and you find that the gears are difficult to engage, the pedal action is stiff, or there is any sign that the clutch pedal is reluctant to come back up again, then the chances are that the clutch cable is damaged. Read more

How a car clutch works

The first stage in the transmission of a car with a manual gearbox is the clutch. Read more

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